Kirsty McHugh, ‘Manuscript Travel Accounts of Scotland and Wales’

Kirsty McHugh is a first-year doctoral research student at the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies. She is part of the AHRC Curious Travellers project. Here, she adapts her paper from the inaugural CRECS Conference for our blog.

My research focuses on manuscript journals, diaries and letters recording the experiences of individuals and groups travelling in Scotland and Wales in the Romantic period. Since beginning my research degree in October 2015 I’ve become aware of the unique opportunities that exploring this topic affords, but also its challenges—in part, due to the nature of travel writing, but also because existing research has been largely based on published travel writing. Here I offer a brief overview of where my research has led me thus far. Continue reading

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Visiting Speaker, 1 Dec 2015: Jennie Batchelor on The Lady’s Magazine

Jennie Batchelor (University of Kent) will be presenting her paper, ‘“The world is a large volume”: The Lady’s Magazine and Romantic Print Culture’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 1 December 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.01, and will be followed by a wine reception.

Abstract

2015.03.batchelorThis talk examines the position of the Lady’s Magazine: or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex (1770–1832) in Romantic-era print culture and the scholarship surrounding it. Aside from the periodical’s extraordinary popularity and longevity, a number of ambitious claims have been made for the Lady’s Magazine’s historical and literary importance. Chief amongst these is Edward Copeland’s 1995 claim that the Lady’s Magazine defined women’s engagement with the world in the Romantic period. This argument is as seductive as it is unsubstantiated. Eighteenth-century periodicalists commonly overlook the title, which emerges after the often lamented if somewhat exaggerated demise of the essay-periodical epitomised by The Tatler and The Spectator. Romanticists, meanwhile, have tended to privilege the self-professedly ‘literary’ magazines of the turn of the century, in which writers such as Hazlitt and Scott, well known for their work in other more canonical genres, were involved.

This paper seeks to address this oversight by explicating how the magazine self-consciously and strategically positioned itself in relationship to the wider and highly competitive literary marketplace in which it thrived against the odds. In making these claims, I draw on initial research findings from our two-year Leverhulme-funded Research Project Grant: ‘The Lady’s Magazine (1770–1818): Understanding the Emergence of a Genre’. The project offers a detailed bibliographical, statistical and literary-critical analysis of one of the first recognisably modern magazines for women from its inception in 1770. In its three-pronged book history/literary critical/digital humanities approach, the project, like this talk, aims to answer two main research questions: 1) What made the Lady’s Magazine one of the most popular and enduring titles of its day?; 2) What effects might an understanding of the magazine’s content, production and circulation have upon own conceptions of Romantic-era print culture, a field still struggling fully to emerge from the shadows of canonical figures and genres?

Continue reading

Visiting speaker, 24 Mar 2015: Gowan Dawson on citizen science in the 19th and 21st centuries

Gowan Dawson (University of Leicester) will be presenting his paper, ‘Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 24 March 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48.

Abstract
The ‘Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries’ project is an innovative collaboration between the Universities of Oxford and Leicester in partnership with the Natural History Museum, the Royal College of Surgeons and the Royal Society. The project explores, and contributes to, the growing movement of what has come to be known as ‘Citizen Science’, partly through working with contemporary scientists involved in the online Zooniverse network, but also through historical research into the networks and communities who contributed to science in the nineteenth century, at a period when divisions between professionals and amateurs were only just emerging. This paper will focus on the project’s historical research on scientific periodicals, examining the possibilities of drawing on historical understandings of the role of science journals in the nineteenth century’s information revolution to enhance citizen participation in science in the twenty-first century’s own digital revolution. Continue reading

Visiting Speaker, 24 Feb 2015: Holly Luhning on Eliza Haywood and the literary marketplace

Holly Luhning (University of Surrey) will be presenting her paper, ‘Eliza Haywood: Cultural and Corporeal Adaptation’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 24 February 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48.

Abstract
Eliza Haywood carefully crafted her public debut with the publication of Love in Excess (1719); as her career progressed she became an important innovator in the development of the novel. This talk will consider how Haywood first emerged in the literary marketplace, and move on to examine her often-neglected, but formally innovative mid-career, with particular focus on Adventures of Eovaai, and her translation of Crebillon’s Le Sopha. These two texts exemplify the depth and range of Haywood’s activities as a innovator of narrative and the novel, and of how her work as a translator (and also position of translatee) contributed not only to the rise of the novel, but also the spread of the novel. Haywood’s career, when considered as a whole, reveal her to be an a much more important cultural player in terms of the development of the novel than many ‘stories’ of the novel may suggest. Continue reading

Visiting Speaker, 10 Feb 2015: Freya Johnston on editing Thomas Love Peacock

Freya Johnston (University of Oxford) will be presenting her paper, ‘Medieval Graffiti: Editing Thomas Love Peacock’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 10 February 2015. The talk will take place in the Cardiff University’s John Percival Building, Room 2.48.

Abstract
This paper reflects on the challenges and rewards of editing a writer whose works have routinely been described as ‘inaccessible’. Even if his comic fictions abound, like Jane Austen’s, with clever, good-looking women and with sparkling dialogue that culminates in marriage, Peacock’s repartee can be hard to follow. This is partly because he does not aspire to the portrayal of interiority—perhaps the most cherished aspect of Austen’s novels. Rather, his characters, both male and female, exist primarily in order to share, voice, and test the limits of their ideas. His fictions, rebuffing intimacy, are inescapably political and intellectual. This paper will show that to approach the nineteenth-century novel via Peacock is to see it as an outward-facing genre indebted to philosophical tracts, lectures, classical dialogues and the rhythms of parliamentary debate. Continue reading

CFP: BARS 2015 Conference—Romantic Imprints (16–19 July 2015, Cardiff)

The BARS 2015 website will shortly be going live, but in the meanwhile, we’re posting the 2nd Call for Papers.

2nd Call for Papers: Romantic Imprints

British Association for Romantic Studies, 14th International Conference

Cardiff University, 16–19 July 2015

Download as PDF

Download as PDF

Proposals are invited for the 2015 British Association for Romantic Studies international conference which will be held at Cardiff University, Wales (UK) on 16–19 July 2015. The theme of the interdisciplinary conference is Romantic Imprints, broadly understood to include the various literary, cultural, historical and political manifestations of Romantic print culture across Europe, the Americas and the rest of the world. Our focus will fall on the ways in which the culture of the period was conscious of itself as functioning within and through, or as opposed to, the medium of print. The conference location in the Welsh capital provides a special opportunity to foreground the Welsh inflections of Romanticism within the remit of the conference’s wider theme. The two-hundredth anniversary of Waterloo also brings with it the chance of thinking about how Waterloo was represented within and beyond print.

The confirmed keynote speakers for Romantic Imprints will be John Barrell (Queen Mary, London), James Chandler (Chicago), Claire Connolly (Cork), Peter Garside (Edinburgh) and Devoney Looser (Arizona State). Continue reading